Enquiries

The central area of this London townhouse was completely opened up to create an impressive, open-plan central area spread across two separate floors. The upper floor is bordered by clear glass balustrades, ensuring the safety of the home's occupants while seamlessly integrating the two levels of living spaces. 

The rear of the house was made much brighter by the introduction of several oversized glazed exterior facades, made up of large frameless-effect structural glass walls. The two glass elevations flood the space with natural light whilst ensuring carefully minimal detailing. Throughout the renovation, bright white walls and ceilings allow this influx of light to bounce around the space, emphasising the new open plan design. 

 

 

 

Glazed internal balutrades run the length of the two mezzanines on opposite sides of the open-plan space, allowing the light to flood interrumpted from the large, first floor windows on each side of the house. The balustrades were designed to be completely frameless, creating a very minimal design that doesn't interrupt the line of sight between each open level of the home. 

The balustrades were specified with single glazed, toughened glass to ensure their load bearing capacity without the need of a solid handrail, while the use of a laminate interlayer ensures that in the unlikely event of glass breakage, any shattered glass is held in place and prevented from causing any harm to the occupants of the home. 

Similarly, fire rated frameless glass was used in each of the main exits and doors throughout the extension. As well as complying with building regulations and providing essential protection to the renovated open plan space, using frameless fire rated glazing allowed for the continuation of the minimal aesthetic using throughout the home. 

The two double-height structural glass windows on the ground floor are positioned so that they appear to meet at the corner, creating an elegant angular connection between the sections of frameless glass. The frameless effect was created by hiding the outer frame within the building's finishes, with just the edge of the black backpainted seal visible when viewed from an angle. 

One of the glass walls fits neatly below the rear mezannine, creating a sunken section of space bordered with ceiling-high bookcases, looking out onto the picturesque garden beyond. The adjacent glazed facade spans the rear wall of a large, minimal playroom, creating a light-filled space for the homeowner's children to learn and play. 

 

Structural Glass Wall